10/23/19 ʻOhana

Members KS Kapālama Deputation Team, led by Kahu Barrett Awai spoke to our KES haumāna and kumu about Faith, Hope and Love at today’s ʻOhana! Mahalo to our seniors who shared their heart, gifts and testimony – Amy Sotoa, Chelsey Sagon, Zach Lorenzo and Pilinamaka Fronda.

Lenten Week 7: He is Risen! He is Risen Indeed!

KS Kapālama Hope Kahu Barrett Awai, KSK Keiki Kahu Kristin Tampon and KSK
Keiki Kahu Evan Gates share their Easter mana‘o.
Ua Ala Hou ʻO ia! Ua Ala Hoʻi Ē!
“He is Risen! He is Risen, Indeed!”
Kamehameha Schools has created a series of Hawaiian-focused devotionals for Lent,
to honor the deep Christian faith of our founder Princess Pauahi. The devotionals
were designed to be used by staffers, students and others to celebrate the coming
of Easter, so please feel free to share them.

May we reflect today and forevermore with faith on the Gospel of Luke 24:33-34.
 
And they rose that same hour and returned to Jerusalem. And they found the eleven
and those who were with them gathered together, saying, “The Lord has risen indeed,
and has appeared to Simon!”

He manaʻo o nā haumāna
Evan Gates, KS Kapālama Keiki Kahu
The promise of Christ’s resurrection on Easter is a sign of humility for all to witness.
For our all-powerful God to lay down His own Son for the sake of establishing hope
of redemption for us is the most humbling sacrifice imaginable. In our lives, this calls
upon each of us to truly reflect on our own moments of pride and to humble
ourselves. For as much as we may fare well now, we all require the grace of God to
live eternally.

Kristin Tampon, KS Kapālama Keiki Kahu
It’s so true that we are undeserving of Jesus’ love and sacrifice! The way I like to
show my gratitude is by using this history and holiday as a reminder of why I should
always push myself to do greater things in Christ’s name. Jesus died so that we may
live fully, and I’ll show thanks through living my life boldly in honor of His name.
Through the miracle of his resurrection, we know that there is nothing we can’t
achieve with Jesus by our side.

Ka mana‘o o ka limahana
Barrett Awai, KS Kapālama Hope Kahu
Our beloved Pauahi exemplified this through her honorable life as a great servant
leader at her place of worship – Kawaiahaʻo Church – and to all the people of Hawai‘i
forevermore! Let the Word of our God through the Gospel of John 3:17 encourage
and inspire us to i mua!
 
ʻAʻole nō hoʻi i hoʻouna mai ke Akua i kāna Keiki i ke ao nei, i hoʻohewa ai ʻo ia i ko ke
ao nei; akā, i ola ai ko ke ao nei ma ona lā.
 
For God did not send His Son into the world to condemn the world, but to save the
world through Him.
 
Like our Lord’s resurrection, we too as a lāhui have been resurrected in Christ Jesus
by the unending love and grace of God! I ola ai ko ke ao nei ma ona lā!

Pule
Mahalo e Iesū for Your sacrifice and resurrection! May we as a lāhui forever honor You
by living out Your Word! ʻĀmene!

Lent Week 6: Pau Akula! “It Is Finished!”

KS Kapālama senior Caleb Santa Monica and Christian Education Kumu Kaniela
Hughes share their mana‘o.
Lent Week 6:  Pau Akula! “It is Finished!”
Kamehameha Schools has created a series of Hawaiian-focused devotionals for Lent,
to honor the deep Christian faith of our founder Princess Pauahi. The devotionals
were designed to be used by staffers, students and others to celebrate the coming
of Easter, so please feel free to share them.

Heluhelu Baibala/Scripture Reading  
A loaʻa iā Iesū ka vīnega, ʻī maila ia, Pau akula! A kūlou ihola kona poʻo, a kuʻu aku ia
i ka ʻuhane.
 
When Jesus had received the sour wine, he said, “It is finished,” and he bowed his
head and gave up his spirit. – John 19:30
 
Ka mana‘o o ka limahana
Kaniela Hughes, KS Kapālama Christian Education Kumu 
When we say something is pau, what exactly do we mean? When a makua asks
a keiki if they washed the dishes, do they mean only the plates or ALL of the dishes?
To proclaim that something is pau is to claim that all aspects of the task in question
have been completed. ALL the dishes have been cleaned. Something is either
finished or incomplete. This brings us to the very essence of the gospel, so let’s look
at what was finished.
 
Iesū is referring to several things, but ultimately, He is referring to the work and
payment of the salvation of His bride, the Church. He proclaims, with His last breath,
that everything necessary for the atonement of His people has been fulfilled. With
this bold proclamation, the Christian can rest in the blessed assurance that the wrath
of Ke Akua has been fully satisfied. The law and all its requirements for holiness have
been finished, the debt of sin has been canceled and finished, death itself has been
conquered, the once-for-all atonement of the Bride has been finished, and the guilt
and shame from sin are no more!
 
Why is the gospel good news? Because Iesū finished ALL the requirements for
salvation, and through faith alone, by grace alone, we are saved because of His
perfect work alone, not our own imperfect merit. It is finished! Soli Deo Gloria!
Glory to God alone!
 
Ka manaʻo o ka haumana
Caleb Santa Monica, KS Kapālama Senior 
Ua pau au, I agree that when Jesus died everything was atoned for and was and
is our future to be with Him eternally. All we must do is accept this wonderful gift
He has blessed us with and to repent and receive what Iesū has done in completion
for our shortcomings.

Pule
E ke Akua aloha, e mililani a hoʻonani mau ana nō mākou i Kou inoa hemolele. Ua
pau akula Kāu Keiki Hiwahiwa, a lilo i mōliaola no ko ke ao nei i loaʻa ʻē ke ola mau
iā mākou a pau loa.

Oh merciful God, we shall forever praise and glorify Your holy name. You gave Your
precious Son who died as a sacrifice for all humanity, that we all may have salvation.
Ma Kona inoa, ʻo Iesū mākou e pule ai. In His name, Jesus, we pray, ʻāmene.

Lent Week 5: “Ua Make Wai?” (Thirsty?)

KS Kapālama Christian Education Instructor Kainat Bashir and KSK seventh grader
Makana Fake share their mana‘o.
Lent Week 5: “Ua Make Wai?” (Thirsty?)
Kamehameha Schools has created a series of Hawaiian-focused devotionals for Lent,
to honor the deep Christian faith of our founder Princess Pauahi. The devotionals
were designed to be used by staffers, students and others to celebrate the coming
of Easter, so please feel free to share them.

Ka mana‘o o ka limahana
Kainat Bashir, KS Kapālama Christian Education Instructor 

ʻŌlelo noʻeau says “Ola i ka wai a kaʻōpua.” There is life in the water from the clouds.
Wai, water; Ke Akua’s gracious gift to all His creation of the world. Everyone depends
on this free necessity, yet at times we fail to acknowledge its worth. Similarly, Iesū
Kristo’s unconditional love is often taken for granted. Yet, on the cross, this giver of
never-ending living water was thirsty for a sip of water.

Ma hope aʻela, ʻike ihola ʻo Iesū, ua pau nā mea i ka hana ʻia, ʻī maila ia, i kō ai ka
palapala hemolele, “Ua make wai au.”

Later, knowing that everything had now been finished, and so that Scripture would be
fulfilled, Jesus said, “I am thirsty.” – John 19:28

By physically dying on the cross, and by enduring all the torture and shame, Iesū
emptied himself for us on the cross. When Iesū said, “Ua make wai au,” His thirst is
more than just for a drink of water. As our Savior, He was and still is thirsty for our
salvation through repentance. He still thirsts for us, as it is written in the scriptures:

‘A‘ole e hoʻokaʻulua ka Haku ma ka mea āna i ʻōlelo mai ai, e like me kā kekahi poʻe
i manaʻo mai ai i ka lohi; akā, ua ahonui mai ʻo ia iā kākou; ʻaʻole makemake ʻo ia e
make kekahi; akā, e hoʻi mai nā kānaka a pau i ka mihi.

The Lord is not slow in keeping His promise, as some understand slowness. Instead,
he is patient with you, not wanting anyone to perish, but everyone to come to
repentance. – 2 Peter 3:9
 
ʻO ka mea e manaʻoʻiʻo iaʻu, e like me kā ka palapala hemolele i ʻī mai ai, e kahe mau
mai nā muliwai no loko mai o kona ʻōpū.

Jesus says, “If anyone is thirsty, he should come to Me and drink. The one who
believes in Me, as the Scripture has said, will have streams of living water flow from
deep within him.” – John 7:38

Eia ka wai lā, he wai e ola. E ola nō e! Here is the water, the water of life. Life, indeed!

Ka manaʻo o ka haumana
Makana Fake, KS Kapālama Seventh Grader
 
Jesus’ thirst on the cross did not symbolize that He needed a sip of water, Jesus
was symbolizing how He emptied Himself for us, so that we may live without sin. He
is calling upon His people to quench His thirst. How can we do this? We can do this
by loving God with all of our heart!
 
However, the question is are we willing to quench His thirst by being obedient and
loyal to Him? Although this verse reveals one of the final moments before Jesus’s
physical death, in essence, it is the representation of the death of our sins and the
beginning of our redemption through Iesū Kristo as a lāhui! And in the words of our
Lord Himself, may we as a lāhui find and drink the water of life we truly seek and
need!
 

Lent Week 4: “E Kuʻu Akua, No Ke Aha Lā?” (My God, Why?)

KS Maui Keiki Kahu Kiare Cabanting and KSM Christian Education Instructor Monica
Mata share their mana‘o.
Lent Week 4: “E Kuʻu Akua, No Ke Aha Lā?” (My God, Why?)
Kamehameha Schools has created a series of Hawaiian-focused devotionals for Lent,
to honor the deep Christian faith of our founder Princess Pauahi. The devotionals
were designed to be used by staffers, students and others to celebrate the coming
of Easter, so please feel free to share them.
 
Ka mana‘o o ka limahana
Monica Mata, KS Maui Christian Education Instructor 

“Boom” and “crackle” abound, as premature celebrations conveyed anticipation of
the New Year.  Nearly suppertime on Sunday and I had ʻEkalesia kuleana. The phone
rang, expecting ʻohana urging me to the party. Instead I was told dad had a heart
attack. Living around the corner I arrived at the ER within minutes. Yet despite
abundant prayers, my father passed at 6:56 p.m. Achingly I cried, “Why, God?”
                                                   
A i ka iwa o ka hora, kāhea akula ʻo Iesū me ka leo nui, ʻī akula, ʻElī, ʻElī, lamā
sabaketani? ʻO ia hoʻi kēia, E kuʻu Akua, e kuʻu Akua; no ke aha lā ʻoe i haʻalele
mai ai iaʻu? – Mataio 27:46
 
About the ninth hour, Jesus cried out with a loud voice, saying, “Eli, Eli, lama

sabachthani?” that is, “My God, My God, why have You forsaken Me?”
– Matthew 27:46

 
Quoting Psalm 22:1a, Jesus took upon the world’s sins, thus separating from the
Father. A purpose dreaded, anguished in the garden, ultimately fulfilled out of love.
 
Our Lord knows we hurt. Death or incarceration of a loved one. An extremely sick
child. A diagnosis of Alzheimer’s, mental or terminal illness. A house burns, a job loss,
financial strain sets in. Recklessness and a spouse leaves or violence ensues. In this
darkness, Jesus shouted in agony, “My God, why…?”
 
Immanuel (God with us) embraces in the pain. Deepening our faith in, maturing our
knowledge of, and bringing greater intimacy with Ke Akua Mana Loa. When we call
on the name of our sacrificial Lamb, we’ll never be separated from Ka Makua Lani –
because Iesū Kristo already was.
 
Ka manaʻo o ka haumana
Kiare Cabanting, KS Maui Keiki Kahu
“My God, My God, why have you forsaken me?” Jesus cried at the moment he knew
the weight of the world fell on his shoulders. In trialing times it may seem God
forsakes us and leaves us out to dry. But when faithful to him all things work together
for good (Romans 8:28). 

It is easy to get caught in the moment and think God is against you when you feel
there is no way out but he is always in your corner no matter how it may seem. So
even at the moment where you feel God has “forsaken you” call out to him, run to
him and believe in all that he has in store for you.