Sessions

The EdToday learning track will focus on current tools, resources, approaches, and best practices in the classroom. What real-world, current applications are hot topics in education? Sessions cover topics such as technology, tools, interdisciplinary learning, and cross-collaboration.

3D Design and Printing using Tinkercad – Marc Nakayama, Greg Kent

What do you want to make? In this session, weʻll learn the basics of Tinkercad and explore whatʻs possible with 3D designing and printing. Come create something for yourself and weʻll help you print it. From imagination to design to printed piece…weʻll take you through the entire process.

Ala Wai Restoration and Monitoring – Naia Lum & Matthew Hockenberger-Leong

Students participating in ‘Iolani School’s innovation and STEM programs will be presenting on their most recent projects. This is a student-led presentation. Participants will be immersed into new ideas of innovation to restore our environment. Projects being presented include a water-sampling drone and a series of environmental remote monitoring sensors deployed along the Ala Wai Canal.

Art in Mathematics – Sandra Manning

What are some ways other than translations you can incorporate art into your mathematics classroom.  Come play and do art.

Books and Tech – The Perfect Mashup! – Gail Lovely

Books and technologies belong together. Story, voice, content, point-of-view, illustration, books bring all of these learning and reflection opportunities and so much more. Technologies can offer ways for students to interact with, reflect upon, alter, and create books in many ways. During this session you will have the opportunity to pair technologies with some of your favorite children’s books. You will explore ways to dive into illustration, words and word choices, storylines, characters, and more using technologies like digital cameras (stand alone, or on a phone or tablet), digital art tools, apps and more. Bring a favorite children’s book or choose from one of Gail Lovely’s and actively explore the possibilities.
Note to Attendees: Come ready to learn and to work with others. Bring a smartphone, tablet, laptop or other device if you can.

Bringing Cardboard to Life – Nozomi Ozaki

Bring your cardboard prototypes and models to life! In this session, we will use a variety of materials, tools, and techniques to bring your cardboard creations to life! Want to cut cardboard with ease? Make movable and adjustable parts? Youʻll walk away with samples and models that you can use with your students immediately!

Build a Food Computer: How to Implement Open Source Tech in the Classroom – Melanie Shimano

In this session, attendees will build a miniature Food Computer and learn how to easily incorporate open-sourced technology into classroom project-based learning. In this session, everyone will make a Computer-controlled, hydroponic, personal garden with a Raspberry Pi (a $35, palm-sized Computer) and materials from a home-improvement store to learn how we can easily create a hands-on curriculum that engages students with technology and real-world challenges.
Note to Attendees: If you would like to keep the food computer youʻll be building, please bring the following with you to the session:
Raspberry Pi (https://www.adafruit.com/product/3055)
MicroSD Card with Software (https://www.adafruit.com/product/1583)
Raspberry Pi Power Supply (https://amzn.to/2FRVKM0)
You will eventually also need a Grow Light (https://amzn.to/2rr0mnI)

Coding in Early Learning: What? Why? When? How? – Gail Lovely

The education world is abuzz with talk about coding. What exactly is coding and why is it “the buzz”? This session will define coding and why you may want to integrate coding into work you and your students are doing in your early learning classroom, in fact you may discover you are already on your way to including coding. We will examine purposeful integration of coding and computational thinking in math, science and literacy in this example-rich session. Be ready to leave this session with ways to begin to purposefully implement coding and computational thinking in your classroom.

Create Your Own Google Expeditions with the NEW Tour Creator! – Michael Fricano II

Create a VR tour of your campus, community, or while your on that amazing field trip! Student created Virtual Reality tours are one of the most powerful ways to help students learn about the places they are exploring and where they are from. In this session you’ll learn and PRACTICE using an amazing and BRAND NEW tool called the Google Poly Tour Creator!
Note to Attendees: Install Google Street View for iOS or Android on your mobile device.

CyberKoa: A Student Cybersecurity Team – Emi Ahlo, Sage Maxwell

Come hear from the CyberKoa students! CyberKoa is the first team out of Kamehameha Schools to compete in the CyberPatriots competition — a cybersecurity competition that puts teams of high school students into the roles of newly hired IT professionals tasked with finding cybersecurity vulnerabilities. During the session, the CyberKoa team will walk you through an activity where you can pretend to be a newly hired IT professional.

Drone Integration – Marisa Vickery

This session will focus on specific activities to bring drones into the classroom, beginning with an elementary focus on introductory coding and using drones for computational thinking across the curriculum. The discussion will then move to computational thinking for older students through programming and photography with emphasis on both classroom and extra-curricular activities. This session will provide ideas, access to curriculum, and activities for both primary and advanced learners.

Electronic Cutters (Silhouette CAMEO) in the Classroom – Marc Nakayama

Electronic Cutters, such as the Silhouette CAMEO are great for cutting paper, cardstock, vinyl, fabric, heat transfer paper, and more! In this hands-on session, we will design and learn to use the Silhouette CAMEO to produce cardstock cutouts, models, vinyl stickers, and heat transfer designs that can be used to customize shirts or anything else you can iron it on to (bring your own shirt or take the transfer paper home with you). Participants should bring a laptop (PC or Mac) and your imagination… let the making begin!

Exploring Anne Frank’s Reality: A Virtual Tour – Sarah Cauthen

Through this presentation, participants will learn about the use of virtual reality to enhance student’s understanding after reading The Diary of Anne Frank. I will present the lesson for the virtual reality scavenger hunt I created and walk participants through the experience I had with students. I will share my observations of student engagement and how the lesson helped my students further develop of empathy and understanding of the Frank’s experience.

Google Expeditions VR for Daily Curriculum Use – Michael Fricano II

Google Expeditions is an engaging 360° virtual reality learning experiences created by Google for Education. Learn how it can be infused into daily curriculum use through scaffolded & collaborative lessons designed for use with G Suite for Edu apps.
Note to Attendees: Install Google Expeditions app for iOS or Android on mobile device

Implementing a Flipped Classroom in a High School Geometry Class – Diana Ching-Teruya, Regina Byrom

We will demonstrate the technology used to implement a flipped classroom in a high school Geometry class.

Introduction to 3D Printing & Tinkercad – Greg Kent, Raylene Tom

Greg Kent and Raylene Tom from Kailua Elementary will share their experience working with 3rd – 6th students (and teachers) to develop their digital 3D design skills and its integration into the curriculum through Design Thinking. They will also be guiding participants through the process of creating and printing a “maker coin” as an introduction to Tinkercad and the 3D printing process.

Introduction to OneNote – The Ultimate Collaboration Tool – Benson Kwok, Microsoft

Learning is more powerful and dynamic with tools that are already right in front of you – and it’s up to educators to impress this on students in the classroom.

With Microsoft OneNote, educators can create digital notebooks that support academic standards and education outcomes across disciplines and tasks, such as writing, reading, mathematics, science, history, CTE, and elective courses. Students may use OneNote across content areas and grade levels, and use OneNote to compile and organize unstructured information, research, and content. OneNote also supports research, collaboration, information management, communication, note taking, journaling, reflective writing, and academic requirements.

OneNote is free and available online at https://www.onenote.com/Download.
Also available for Mac, ios, Android and the Web.

IPad Playground – Wendy Oliver, Kaulana Dameg and the Creativity Playground Crew

In this hands on iPad Playground, you will have the opportunity to explore developmentally appropriate apps for grades Prek-2 that promote active use and open-ended exploration for keiki. Come play and learn how to use these FREE apps that will inspire creativity, design, exploration, media creation and even app smashing for your keiki.  Appropriate for Prek-2.

LEGO – Greg Kent, Raylene Tom

Come explore and experience the different Lego tools/sets that Kailua Elementary is using with K-6th graders to grow the “maker Mindset” and how these are being integrated into the curriculum.
Learn2learn- animals and their habitats
video
Resources from K – rubric and handout?
Wedo2.0 – Intro to Robotics (1st-3rd)
Share photos of 2nd grade pollinators/animal adaptation and 1st intro
Machines and mechanisms-Catapult
Design Thinking/design challenge
Delivering supplies safely to communities in need/Offense-defence
Pictures
Design thinking process
EV3 – Intro to robotics-building and programming (4th-6th)
Overview of software and hardware and examples of connection to community
4th Ahupua’a

Project Management: A Skill for Classroom Success to Successful Careers – Dr. Joslyn Sato

Many organizations across the globe perform project-oriented work using projects because it allows organizations to optimize resources while increasing the quality of the end product through planning and management of all activities.  This means that once students enter the workforce they will either be part of a project or leading a project during their careers.

In the classroom, students also perform projects and use project-based-learning; however, students often wait until the night before to complete their projects and end up not achieving optimal results. What comes natural for professional project managers may be foreign to teachers and their students.

This workshop will introduce concepts, tools, and techniques about project management and how they can be applied in the classroom.  By empowering instructors to use project management in the classroom, their students can improve project outcomes, gain career readiness skills, and become valuable and effective team members in their careers. 

QR Codes: Magical Tools for Learning and Sharing – Gail Lovely

Go from a QR code “wannabe” to a QR code “magician” in under an hour! We will explore what QR codes are, why they are magically useful, and how they can be used for learning. You will leave knowing how to make several different kinds of QR codes using a variety of tools as well as how to have students and others access the codes. You will experience a variety of settings, implementation ideas, learning centers, and activities you can easily develop for your classroom, library, or media center. Come explore the magic of QR codes in this super friendly, practical session.
Note to Attendees: Please bring a smartphone, tablet or even laptop with camera and download a free QR Code Scanner (like i-nigma).

Robotics Playground: Where Technology and Learning Meet – Julee Kaiaokamalie

Everyone can add coding to their curriculum! In my workshop, I will be addressing the importance of teaching kids to code. Letʻs give our kids the best opportunities, especially in science, technology, engineering and math. I have put together some helpful advice to help participants introduce coding into their curriculum. This techventure will allow participants to explore and code various robots in a fun nonthreatening atmosphere. Participants will learn to build and program robots using exciting robotics learning systems with easy to use programmable languages. Stop by and playJ

Seesaw: Gloriously Connecting Learners and Their Families with Electronic Journals – Celeste Endo, Kelli Ann Ching

Aloha! Our school is so grateful for an amazing addition to our educational tool chest! One year ago, at the Kamehameha Schools EdTech Conference 2017 “Explore the Impossible”, Michelle Colte shared how she used Seesaw with her students. Her enthusiasm inspired us to try Seesaw at Queen Ka‘ahumanu School. Flash forward, in a year, it has made a substantial learning impact! We started by introducing Seesaw in the Tink Think Tank (our technology lab) during every other week technology classes. Many of the homeroom teachers saw how they could utilize Seesaw in their own classes. Families safely & actively witness their keiki explorations.

We will share some of the ways we have been using Seesaw in our various elementary classes. We will show how students as young as kindergarten have been eagerly creating Seesaw learning journals. We will collaboratively experience how wonderfully easy it is to create different types of Seesaw journals! ‘See’ so you can ‘saw’ how our learner experiences have been transformed via this vibrant hub of shared wisdom. Let’s continue this joyous cycle of learning together! Love, Queen Kaʻahumanu School

The Lens of Authentic Audiences and Assessments – Mathieu Williams & Haumāna (Students)

Digital media students will break down their creative process to develop the skill sets and mindsets necessary to succeed inside and outside of the classroom. Through active community engagement and purposeful design, learn applicable strategies and concepts for any content area in order to assess learning through authentic audiences.

The Power of Flipped Learning – Bryan DeVore

Are you looking for a way to free up classroom time to dive deeper into project based learning, collaboration, and to provide students greater one-on-one support and more personalized learning? Flipping your classroom may be just what you are looking for! In this hands-on session for beginners, we will explore the philosophy, methods, benefits, challenges, and tools of flipped learning. We will also practice using free web-based apps for creating instructional videos, as well as tools for actively engaging students with these videos.

Think in 3D, Learn in 3D, Teach in 3D – Marc Nakayama

BlocksCAD is a cloud-based 3D modeling tool that uses math, computational thinking, and coding concepts to design models that can be 3D printed. In this hands-on session, participants will learn the basics of BlocksCAD and create a few simple 3D designs that can be modified and used in your classroom.

Unlocking Creativity in each Student: Minecraft:Education Edition Code Builder – Benson Kwok, Microsoft

Students should be given an environment in which they can work and learn naturally through multiple modalities. Maker education, design thinking, and problem based learning provide an environment in which students of all abilities can innovate, solve real problems, and engage in content in new ways.

Web Math tools to Inspire Creativity – Lance Ogata

In this session attendees will be introduced to a few web based math applications that can be used not just for productivity as a math kumu or in a STEAM classroom, but to inspire creativity through the application of math concepts.

Why Drones? …An Introduction to Drones in Education – Marisa Vickery

Infusing drones into education is a cutting-edge way to incorporate STEM learning and introduce our students to skills that can transfer to future jobs. We will discuss ways to begin a drone program, from choosing the right drone program for your needs to an overview of lessons and areas of content in which to integrate drone edu. An open discussion of bringing drones into education while preserving regulations, safety and privacy will complete this sessions to promote #DronesForGood and inspire educators to launch their own programs.

The DisRuptTomorrow track will provide a glimpse into the future. Which new technologies, systems, and innovations will disrupt education? Sessions cover topics such as VR, AI, future schools, entrepreneurship, blockchain, and micro-credentialing.

“Virtually Anywhere” AR & VR Playground – Michael Fricano II, Kristi Martines, Lance Ogata

Come explore and learn how Augmented and Virtual Reality have the power to transform learning in your classroom! Virtual Reality (VR) can transport your students all over the world, into outer space, and beyond their imagination! Augmented Reality (AR) bridges the real and digital world by letting students literally see and manipulate what they are learning in the palm of their hand. Take your students Virtual Anywhere by exploring the AR & VR Playground!

AI Demos and Beyond – Ian Kitajima

Live demonstrations of artificial intelligence and the next generation of AI being developed at Oceanit.

Augment Learning in the Classroom with Merge Cube – Michael Fricano II

Explore the Solar System, investigate the human body, build amazing structures, hold historical sculptures, play choose-your-own-adventures, manipulate shapes, and even design your own objects to hold, all in the PALM OF YOUR HAND! If you’re not familiar with the Merge Cube craze you will be after this session! It’s one of the hottest Augmented Reality (AR) tools for the classroom. Come learn and play with the Merge Cube!Note to Attendees: Install the following apps on your iOS or Android device: www.janusgroup.us/arvrinedu/merge

Early Learning Creativity Playground – Wendy Oliver, Kaulana Dameg and the Creativity Playground Crew

Join us at the playground for some engaging early learning robotics and circuitry technologies that will inspire creativity, collaboration, and connections to real-world problem solving with your keiki! This will be a hands-on session where you will learn how to build simple circuits that are developmentally appropriate for keiki and also learn to code with iPad driven robots, as well as screen free robots. Appropriate for grades Prek-2

Learning Manipulated in the Palm of Your Hand with Augmented Reality – Michael Fricano II

Augmented Reality (AR) bridges the real and digital world by letting students literally see and manipulate what they are learning in the palm of their hand. In this hands-on, interactive session we’ll explore a variety of AR apps for iOS & Android mobile devices that can be used in Math, Science, Biology, Social Studies, Art, Language Arts, and other subjects.Note to Attendees: Install apps for iOS or Android on mobile devices from this website: www.janusgroup.us/learning-ar/

Making Micro:bit Prototypes – Shane Asselstine & Haumāna

Engage in a hands-on activity to code with MakeCode and make with the Micro:bit! What will you make? How will your code impact the design? Will you focus on form or function when creating your prototype? Join us while we experiment, explore, and experience computer science from unplugged, to digital, to physical with the Micro:bit.

Solving Real-World Problems with Drones in Education – Marisa Vickery

In this session, we will explore industries such as law enforcement, search and rescue and agriculture by recreating authentic scenarios to promote problem solving and “drones for good”. Sample lessons will be shared, in addition to discuss for activities that may directly impact your region. Lessons shared can be conducted with learners in both primary and secondary grades.

Wearable Technology with Micro:bits – Shane Asselstine & Haumāna (Students)

In this session you will learn about physical computing and how it enables us to create wearable technology! Physical computing is when software and hardware interact with the analog world, much like a Fitbit or similar devices. We will use Micro:bits to light up LEDs, communicate between devices, and use sensors like the motion detector or compass. Micro:bits are pocket sized computers that allow you to get creative with digital technology. Whether you are just starting out with computer science, or are looking to take your program to the next level, this session will spark ideas and expand your options!Note to Attendees: You will need a laptop with a USB port. Make sure that you have charged your device as we will be using it throughout this session. Check that you are able to get to the following website on your device: https://makecode.microbit.org/
You do not need any pre-requisites in computer science to participate, this session will be accessible to everyone. This session will be focused on a K8 audience, but can be applied to HS as well.

The EdIdentity track will focus on the culture-based technology practices and positive social-emotional learning experiences that instill within haumāna a strong cultural identity and a desire for lifelong exploration of learning, leading, and innovating within the global community. Sessions cover topics such as social-emotional learning, culture-based education, and fostering student leadership.

Authenticity & Objectivity in Storytelling: Rewriting the Narrative – Beau Bassett & Ciara Lacy

A case study exploring the powerful combination of identity and media, and its ability to ignite shifts in public perceptions and create brave and open spaces for dialogue.

Books and Culture – Sandra Manning

The Kashunimuit School District has a strong cultural program which includes creating books in the native language on both iTunes.  The books are created in the native language, drawn, and some even have sound.  I will be sharing the process and books with you.

Digital Wisdom: Mobilizing the Past to Navigate into the Future – Mary Therese Hattori

Pacific Islanders have successfully navigated toward the future for millenia, traversing waves of environmental, social, political, and technological change. This presentation highlights elements of Pacific islander (CHamoru) culture that form the foundation of a culturally sustaining technology leadership praxis within the context of American educational institutions. I offer this as an example that may help others develop their own culturally sustaining practices and inspire creation of student and professional leadership development programs which honor native cultures while facilitating effective professional practices in mainstream settings.  Drawing on her Pacific islander (CHamoru) heritage, as well as her teaching and leadership experience, Dr. Hattori will share leadership strategies for a world of increasing digital transformation, disruption, and diversity.

E Nānā i ke Kumu – Look to the Source – Heitiare Kawehi Kammerer & Michelle Kanoelehua Kamalii-Ligsay

Using experience in Kaiapuni Education and working in KS Maui, we will share what we have been moonshooting to engage haumāna and kumu in ʻIke Hawaiʻi using technology. Our aloha for ʻIke Hawaiʻi, Pāheona (Art) and ʻEnehana (Technology) combined showcases the learner outcomes of E Ola! and World Class Hawaiian Culture Based Education (WCHCBE). We will hone in on the roots and foundation of WCHCBE which is the “Hawaiian” or ʻIke Hawaiʻi. ʻIke Hawaiʻi is key and must be the core and foundation of education in Hawaiʻi nei. E nānā i ke kumu…recharge and plug into the source. The ʻIke of our Kūpuna is here for us to access. Put on your ʻIke Hawaiʻi lense and realize that Native Intelligence is embedded in the culture and language. E hoʻi i ka piko. Know thy self and return to the source.

Giving Breath to Our Words| Enabling Indigenous Narratives Through Technology – Mary Therese Hattori

In Oceania, breath is sacred and life-giving.  The spoken word is deeply valued even in the digital era.  González (2000) states, “words are sacred in creation-centered traditions. They create realities with which we must live. Words are spiritual, with power and energy which lives through them.” Ong (1982) asserts, “Oral cultures indeed produce powerful and beautiful verbal performances of high artistic and human worth, which are no longer even possible once writing has taken possession of the psyche.”

The printed word is devoid of breath yet is the primary currency of the academy and a crucial tool for success in education. Pacific islanders from cultures who prize orality can be hindered by the primacy of print in Euro-American tertiary institutions.  Technology provides tools to put breath back into words, to empower and enable indigenous narratives and provide culturally sustaining experiences. Drawing on her background as a native CHamoru of Guahan (Guam) and experiences as student, educator, technology director, researcher, and mentor, Dr. Hattori will share her path to achieving the CHamoru goal of inafa’maolek (making right, harmony), using technology to enable indigenous narratives.  In this presentation, specific tools and strategies to support, engage, and empower indigenous students will be shared.

Kealaʻula + TED-Ed HI – Alan Tamayose

Join me on my journey towards new possibilities with the Kealaʻula Innovations Institute. My essential question was, “Can world-class Hawaiian culture-based education be defined by student voices?” My exploration culminated in establishing TED-Ed HI.

TED-Ed Club @ Hālau ʻĪnana is a collaboration of students from public, private, and charter schools in Honolulu, Hawaiʻi.

Project Kuleana – Process vs Product – Leah Kihara & Haumāna (Students)

“Through a multi-disciplinary, hands-on approach, Project Kuleana Kamehameha aims to provide its students a deeper understanding of mele: Hawaiian poetic expression in song which allows them to reflect on their own identity and voice. 
In a year long course, students produce a Project Kuleana music video in which they perform in front of the camera, capture and mix audio, as well as videotape and edit the visuals.  Students gain from the expertise of kumu in the Performing Arts and Midkiff Learning Center Digital Media Departments as well as collaborators throughout Kamehameha Schools and the community.

While the final music video showcases the beauty of their skills and talents, the overall emphasis of the class is on the process.  Students take ownership as their kumu empower them with the planning, decision-making and execution of the project.  First, they studied mele to provide a foundation in their song choice for this year, Uluwehi Waipao.  They visited Waipao in Heʻeia (Kāneʻohe), to hear the moʻolelo about the area, see itʻs geographical features, and feel itʻs winds and rains.  Then, they worked collaboratively to storyboard and plan the visuals to capture all their experiences. 

The culminating experience goes beyond the classroom allowing students to reflect on their successes, failures and challenges to transform their own ideas of self-identity.  Through this haumana gain a new perspective to embrace their own kuleana to their ʻāina and lāhui. “

Utopian Minecraft World – Gay Murakami

Kamehameha Middle School Kapālama 7th grade Life Skills and Health classes used game based learning and cultural based education to research Native Hawaiian health and wellness issues through the use of Minecraft. Session will include hands on exploration of student created communities and the research process.

What Does Aloha ʻĀina Mean to Me? – Noe Coelho, Joe Kahana, Melissa Parker, Anna Lee-Lum, Nicole Jones & Haumāna (Students)

In our second year of a student-centered, project-based aloha ʻāina curriculum, we want to share the down and dirty process we are going through to create the most exciting, engaging and challenging curriculum we have experienced in our professional careers.  We are far from the ideal model, but we are certainly the most real and energetic group you will come across.  Our students will be on hand to share their projects with you. 

The EdThought track will focus on big picture, innovative ideas in education. Interested in looking for thought partners to engage in deep conversations to inspire you? Sessions cover topics such as design thinking, global competence, student-centered, problem-based, and challenge-based learning.

Fail Forward – Michelle Colte

We’ve heard that hard work and perseverance are the steps to success, but sometimes projects fail despite dedication and effort.  If we learn most from our failures, then why don’t we share our failures?  This presentation will examine a recent project of mine that failed.  I will share the goals of the project, the planning I did with the teachers, the pitfalls we encountered along the way and our reflection for next time. Participants will gain a fresh perspective on failure as well as questions to consider when when collaborating with others to guarantee “success.” Participants will be invited to share their “fails” & discuss how we can “teach failure” so our students learn through failure.

Fulfilling the Mission through a Safety Culture – Ron Worman and Panelists

Education has been conducted the same way for hundreds of years. But like many other market sectors, technology is creating change. And change can have a dramatic impact on the people, processes and tools, as well as, the culture of any organization.
KS EdTech 2018 attempts to identify the key areas of change and provide insights into how we might harness and leverage it to fulfill our mission.
In this spirit, KS EdTech will be introducing a session for Security and Safety.  The goal is to gather an ecosystem of stakeholders both leaders and practitioners to share their manaʻo. On day one we will facilitate a two-hour panel that will seek to describe the current state of security and safety in our schools.  We will then summarize this baseline research the next day in another two-hour session. From this baseline summary, we can explore how we address the risks, as well as the opportunities to leverage security and safety to enhance our culture, our learning environment and our values.  The stakeholders include individuals from legal, IT architecture, safety and security experts and education. This “great conversation” provides an opportunity to include the caring voices of a diverse community that ultimately will shape how we provide for the safety and security of our vision, mission, and people.
Your voice matters! We invite you to join the conversation, share your experiences and help shape the future of safety and security at Kamehameha Schools.

Students as Creators and Communicators – Nani Daniels, Chris Coffelt, Apple

Creativity helps students become better communicators and problem solvers. It prepares them to thrive in today’s world, and to shape tomorrow’s. 
After 40 years working alongside educators, we’ve seen — and research has shown — that creative thinking leads to deeper student engagement. And when students are more engaged, they take more ownership of their learning. Creative skills help students become better problem solvers, communicators, and collaborators. They explore more and experiment more. They tell richer stories and find their own unique voices. They stretch their imaginations and make connections they might not otherwise make — and they carry all these skills through everything they’ll do in school. And beyond.
Through this hands-on session using iPads, you’ll experience and explore meaningful ways for your students to apply their creative skills across mediums.  We’ll also explore the Everyone Can Create curriculum. This is a versatile set of resources designed to help you infuse core creative skills into the topics and subjects you teach every day.
Note to Attendees: Please bring an iPad with the current operating system (iOS 11.x) with the following free Apple apps Clips, Notes, Safari. Some iPads will be provided for those who don’t have one.

Unleashing the Power of Community-Driven Innovation: Education Incubator and Moonshot Lab Hawaiʻi – Miki Tomita, Stephanie Shipton & Haumāna (Students)

In this presentation, we will share how community, culture, and context can provide students with the tools needed to develop audacious solutions to local and global challenges, to achieve the real Moonshot – a system of education that truly empowers our kids and communities to create positive change through innovation and compassion. 

The EdResearch track will focus on what research can teach us about how students learn best, related to social-emotional & brain development, effective learning frameworks and instructional practices. Weʻre interested in hearing how you employ current research findings into practice. Sessions cover topics such as social, cognitive, neuroscience as well as other educational research topics.

Education and the Brain – Chad Otoshi

As Neuroscience research continues to reveal the most effective ways to achieve learning, the need for evidence-based teaching methods has become evident.  Educational Neuroscientist Tracey Tokuhama-Espinosa, Ph.D., focuses her research on the neuroscientific basis of teaching and learning.  Her concepts, principles, and strategies provide a strong foundation for developing evidence-based learning methods that can be implemented in the classroom.  The complimentary research of John Hattie, Ph.D., validates specific techniques and methods, many of which incorporate processes identified through his Visible Learning research.  TES Magazine (formerly the Times Educational Supplement) once referred to Dr. Hattie as, “possibly the world’s most influential education academic.” In this presentation, I will address how the research of Drs. Hattie and Tokuhama-Espinosa can be combined to supplement the educational services provided by the Kamehameha Schools Organization.

Young Children’s Perceptual Experiences when Experiencing Abstract Concepts in Digital Learning Environments – Seungoh Paek

This presentation demonstrates how multimodal interactions with virtual manipulatives impact students’ conceptual understanding of mathematics. More specifically, the author presents a study examining how variations in sensory experience impact students’ understanding of multiplication. One hundred seventy-three (n =173) first and second grade students were randomly assigned to four experimental groups that varied the degree of perceptual richness experienced by systematically varying the aural and kinesthetic interactions. The visual experience was held constant across conditions. The results revealed that participants with the richest sensory experience at the time of learning had the highest learning outcomes at both mid-test and post-test. These results suggest that perceptual richness contributed to participants’ conceptual understanding of the target concept. Based on the findings of the study, the authors discuss the potential of designing young children’s sensory experiences to facilitate learning of abstract concepts.

TUESDAY, JUNE 5, 2018
BREAKOUT SESSION 1

10:00 – 10:50

BREAKOUT SESSION 2

11:00 – 11:50

BREAKOUT SESSION 3

2:00 – 2:50

BREAKOUT SESSION 4

3:00 – 3:50

PIKAKE ROOM Keynote Breakout Session
HAWAIʻI 1 E Nānā i ke Kumu – Look to the Source E Nānā i ke Kumu – Look to the Source The Power of Flipped Learning Unleashing the Power of Community-Driven Innovation: Education Incubator and Moonshot Lab Hawaiʻi
HAWAIʻI 2 Seesaw: Gloriously Connecting Learners and Their Families with Electronic Journals Why Drones? …An Introduction to Drones in Education What Does Aloha ʻĀina Mean to Me? What Does Aloha ʻĀina Mean to Me?
HAWAIʻI 3 Build a Food Computer: How to Implement Open Source Tech in the Classroom Build a Food Computer: How to Implement Open Source Tech in the Classroom Wearable Technology with Micro:bits Wearable Technology with Micro:bits
HAWAIʻI 4 Early Learning Creativity Playground Early Learning Creativity Playground
VIRTUALLY ANYWHERE – HAWAIʻI 5 & 6 “Virtually Anywhere” AR & VR Playground Augment Learning in the Classroom with Merge Cube “Virtually Anywhere” AR & VR Playground Google Expeditions VR for Daily Curriculum Use
HAWAIʻI 7 Unlocking Creativity in each Student: Minecraft:Education Edition Code Builder Introduction to OneNote: The Ultimate Collaboration Tool Students as Creators and Communicators Art in Mathematics
HAWAIʻI 8 Project Kuleana – Process vs Product Unleashing the Power of Community-Driven Innovation: Education Incubator and Moonshot Lab Hawaiʻi QR Codes: Magical Tools for Learning and Sharing Coding in Early Learning: What? Why? When? How?
HAWAIʻI 9 Authenticity & Objectivity in Storytelling: Rewriting the Narrative Drone Integration Drone Integration
HAWAIʻI 10 Ala Wai Restoration and Monitoring Ala Wai Restoration and Monitoring Giving Breath to Our Words| Enabling Indigenous Narratives Through Technology Digital Wisdom: Mobilizing the Past to Navigate into the Future
HAWAIʻI 11 Robotics Playground: Where Technology and Learning Meet Robotics Playground: Where Technology and Learning Meet Young Children’s Perceptual Experiences when Experiencing Abstract Concepts in Digital Learning Environments Exploring Anne Frank’s Reality: A Virtual Tour
MAKERSPACE EXPLORATION CENTER – MAUI ROOM Introduction to 3D Printing & Tinkercad Introduction to 3D Printing & Tinkercad Bringing Cardboard to Life Electronic Cutters (Silhouette CAMEO) in the Classroom
OʻAHU ROOM Fulfilling the Mission through a Safety Culture Fulfilling the Mission through a Safety Culture
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 6, 2018
BREAKOUT SESSION 5

10:00 – 10:50

BREAKOUT SESSION 6

11:00 – 11:50

BREAKOUT SESSION 7

1:00 – 1:50

BREAKOUT SESSION 8

2:00 – 2:50

PIKAKE ROOM Keynote Breakout Session
HAWAIʻI 1 Kealaʻula + TED-Ed HI Web Math Tools to Inspire Creativity
HAWAIʻI 2 Students as Creators and Communicators Fail Forward Solving Real-World Problems with Drones in Education Solving Real-World Problems with Drones in Education
HAWAIʻI 3 Wearable Technology with Micro:bits Wearable Technology with Micro:bits Build a Food Computer: How to Implement Open Source Tech in the Classroom Build a Food Computer: How to Implement Open Source Tech in the Classroom
HAWAIʻI 4 IPad Playground IPad Playground
VIRTUALLY ANYWHERE – HAWAIʻI 5 & 6 Create Your Own Google Expeditions with the NEW Tour Creator! “Virtually Anywhere” AR & VR Playground Learning Manipulated in the Palm of Your Hand with Augmented Reality Augment Learning in the Classroom with Merge Cube
HAWAIʻI 7 Implementing a Flipped Classroom in a High School Geometry Class Authenticity & Objectivity in Storytelling: Rewriting the Narrative Project Kuleana – Process vs Product Books and Culture
HAWAIʻI 8 The Lens of Authentic Audiences and Assessments The Lens of Authentic Audiences and Assessments Books and Tech – The Perfect Mashup! Books and Tech – The Perfect Mashup!
HAWAIʻI 9 Education and the Brain Project Management: A Skill for Classroom Success to Successful Careers Young Children’s Perceptual Experiences when Experiencing Abstract Concepts in Digital Learning Environments Education and the Brain
HAWAIʻI 10 Utopian Minecraft World AI Demos and Beyond AI Demos and Beyond CyberKoa: A Student Cybersecurity Team
HAWAIʻI 11 CyberKoa: A Student Cybersecurity Team Robotics Playground: Where Technology and Learning Meet Utopian Minecraft World
MAKERSPACE EXPLORATION CENTER – MAUI ROOM Think in 3D, Learn in 3D, Teach in 3D 3D Design and Printing using Tinkercad LEGO Making Micro:bit Prototypes
OʻAHU ROOM Fulfilling the Mission through a Safety Culture Fulfilling the Mission through a Safety Culture